Science, medicine&LIFE

medicalschool:

Pterional Craniotomy from the Columbia Neurosurgery Online Curriculum

medicalschool:

Posterior abdominal wall, after removal of the peritoneum, showing kidneys, suprarenal capsules, and great vessels. (Hepatic veins labeled at center top.)

medicalschool:

Posterior abdominal wall, after removal of the peritoneum, showing kidneys, suprarenal capsules, and great vessels. (Hepatic veins labeled at center top.)

corporisfabrica:

Chordae tendineae, also known as heart strings.

Situated inside the heart, these collagenous strands keep the valves of the heart from inverting under the high pressures of systole (heart contractions).

In practice, this means that the direction of blood flow is controlled: blood only moves in one direction when the heart delivers a pump. 

corporisfabrica:

Thermal imaging of a heart surgery.
The core of a human body is significantly hotter than the surface of the skin. Note the influx of hot blood into the coronary arteries as the exposed heart beats. 
Image courtesy of Avio NEC.

corporisfabrica:

Thermal imaging of a heart surgery.

The core of a human body is significantly hotter than the surface of the skin. Note the influx of hot blood into the coronary arteries as the exposed heart beats. 

Image courtesy of Avio NEC.

medicalschool:

Heparin is widely used as an injectable anticoagulant. (It can also be used to form an inner anticoagulant surface on various experimental and medical devices such as test tubes and renal dialysis machines.)
Heparin is a naturally occurring anticoagulant produced by basophils and mast cells. Heparin acts as an anticoagulant, preventing the formation of clots and extension of existing clots within the blood. While heparin does not break down clots that have already formed (unlike tissue plasminogen activator), it allows the body’s natural clot lysis mechanisms to work normally to break down clots that have formed.
Heparin is generally used for anticoagulation for the following conditions:
Acute coronary syndrome (e.g., NSTEMI)
Atrial fibrillation
Deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism
Cardiopulmonary bypass for heart surgery
ECMO circuit for extracorporeal life support
Hemofiltration
Indwelling central or peripheral venous catheters

medicalschool:

Heparin is widely used as an injectable anticoagulant. (It can also be used to form an inner anticoagulant surface on various experimental and medical devices such as test tubes and renal dialysis machines.)

Heparin is a naturally occurring anticoagulant produced by basophils and mast cells. Heparin acts as an anticoagulant, preventing the formation of clots and extension of existing clots within the blood. While heparin does not break down clots that have already formed (unlike tissue plasminogen activator), it allows the body’s natural clot lysis mechanisms to work normally to break down clots that have formed.

Heparin is generally used for anticoagulation for the following conditions:

  • Acute coronary syndrome (e.g., NSTEMI)
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism
  • Cardiopulmonary bypass for heart surgery
  • ECMO circuit for extracorporeal life support
  • Hemofiltration
  • Indwelling central or peripheral venous catheters

(Źródło: Wikipedia)

medicalschool:

Coronary Atherosclerosis
Many individuals who have been diagnosed with coronary atherosclerosis take medications to help hinder further progression of the disease. The class of drugs known as statins, which effectively reduce elevated cholesterol levels, have been especially useful in the battle against the condition and other forms of heart disease.

medicalschool:

Coronary Atherosclerosis

Many individuals who have been diagnosed with coronary atherosclerosis take medications to help hinder further progression of the disease. The class of drugs known as statins, which effectively reduce elevated cholesterol levels, have been especially useful in the battle against the condition and other forms of heart disease.

(Źródło: microscopyu.com)

"The more you learn, the less you know! "

"The more you learn, the less you know! "

s-c-i-guy:

Cells lining the blood vessel walls

The structure of the endothelium, the thin layer of cells that line our arteries and veins, is visible here. The endothelium is like a gatekeeper, controlling the movement of materials into and out of the bloodstream. Endothelial cells are held tightly together by specialized proteins that function like strong ropes (red) and others that act like cement (blue).

Image courtesy of Christopher V. Carman and Roberta Martinelli, Harvard Medical School, Boston.

Source

(via corporisfabrica)

ucresearch:

Researchers at UCLA have developed this organic solar cell, which promises a cheaper and more effective way to harness the sun’s power.  The new cells could serve as a power-generating layer on windows and smartphones without obstructing a person’s ability to see through the surface.

Nice gloves … But, who cares ..?

ucresearch:

Researchers at UCLA have developed this organic solar cell, which promises a cheaper and more effective way to harness the sun’s power.  The new cells could serve as a power-generating layer on windows and smartphones without obstructing a person’s ability to see through the surface.

Nice gloves … But, who cares ..?

(via nanodash)